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  • Friday, October 12, 2018 01:38 PM
    New Guideline for Prostate Cancer Supports Shortened Radiation Therapy - Imaging Technology News (press release) (blog)
    October 12, 2018 — Three prominent medical societies issued a new clinical guideline for physicians treating men with early-stage prostate cancer[1] using external beam radiation therapy (EBRT)[2]. Adoption of the guideline could make treatment shorter and more convenient for many patients with prostate cancer, the most common malignancy among American men.Developed by a panel of experts from the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO), American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) ...
  • Friday, October 12, 2018 09:03 AM
    Treating Bladder Cancer Ups Survival in Sicker Older Patients - Renal and Urology News
    October 12, 2018 Older patients benefit from treatment of superficial bladder cancer even if they have multiple chronic conditions, a new study suggests. Treatment of superficial bladder cancer improves survival among older patients despite multiple chronic conditions (MCC), new study findings suggest.“Currently, older adults with superficial bladder cancer may be subject to over- or undertreatment because it is hard to sort out who will benefit from transurethral resection or intravesical ...
  • Monday, October 01, 2018 03:49 PM
    Genetic Screening for Patients with Prostate Cancer - Todd Morgan - UroToday
    (Length of Discussion: 13 min)Todd Morgan shares the unique program that he and his GU team at the University of Michigan have implemented in an effort to gain a better understanding of the genetics and genomics involved with progression in prostate cancer.Biographies:Todd M. Morgan, M.D. is a urological surgeon specializing in the treatment of genitourinary malignancies and an Associate Professor of Urology and has been at the University of Michigan since 2012.Alicia ...
  • Tuesday, September 18, 2018 04:39 PM
    Dr. Daskivich on the Future Landscape of Prostate Cancer - OncLive
    Timothy J. Daskivich, MD, assistant professor of surgery, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, discusses the future treatment landscape of prostate cancer.Daskivich’s hope is that active surveillance will be the primary therapy for very low-risk and the majority of low-risk prostate cancers. For select low-risk prostate cancers, high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) or other minimally invasive and minimally morbid treatments will be used for those patients who need treatment, states Daskivich. Currently, HIFU is ...
  • Tuesday, September 11, 2018 06:05 AM
    USC research could change robotic surgery in the future - USC News - USC News
    Is there an objective, standardized way to train the next generation of surgeons? Researchers at the Keck School of Medicine of USC think so, with an assist from technology that could change robotic surgery in the future.Using a data recorder plugged into a robotic surgery system, a Keck School of Medicine team analyzed expert and novice surgeons’ movements during the reconstruction step of robotic radical prostatectomy, a common surgery for prostate cancer. ...
  • Tuesday, September 04, 2018 01:18 PM
    The Prostate Cancer Foundation Launches PSA Starring Actor Dax Shepard - Broadway World
    This year marks the 25th anniversary of the Prostate Cancer Foundation's (PCF) efforts of advancing prostate cancer research. In honor of Prostate Cancer Awareness Month this September, the PCF is making it the Prostate Cancer ACTION month to create awareness, spark conversations and raise funds to help accelerate much needed research. For the first time in American history, a record number of landmarks across the U.S. will light up blue ...
  • Tuesday, August 28, 2018 11:49 AM
    High Alcohol Intake in Adolescence May Affect Aggressiveness of Prostate Cancer Later in Life - Specialty Pharmacy Times
    Heavy alcohol consumption at an early age may be linked to a 3-fold increased risk of being diagnosed with high-grade prostate cancer, according to a new study published in Cancer Prevention Research.   Previous studies have supported the association between alcohol intake and increased overall cancer risk; however, researchers aimed to investigate whether alcohol consumption during adolescence is associated with more aggressive prostate cancer later in life. Because the prostate grows rapidly ...
  • Wednesday, August 22, 2018 12:22 PM
    Low Risk Prostate Cancer Imaging More Common Outside of VA Hospitals - MedicalResearch.com (blog)
    MedicalResearch.com Interview with:Dr. MakarovDanil V. Makarov, MD, MHSDepartment of Urology andDepartment of Population HealthNew York University Langone School of MedicineVA New York Harbor Healthcare System,Robert F. Wagner Graduate School of Public ServiceCancer Institute, New York University School of Medicine, New YorkMedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Response: Reducing prostate cancer staging imaging for men with low-risk disease is an important national priority to improve widespread guideline-concordant ...
  • Wednesday, August 08, 2018 11:58 AM
    Expert Emphasizes Inclusivity in Prostate Cancer Trials - OncLive
    Daniel J. George, MDAfrican-American men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) who received abiraterone acetate (Zytiga) plus prednisone in the Abi Race trial showed a longer median time to prostate-specific antigen (PSA) worsening than Caucasian patients.Lead author Daniel J. George, MD, said that these results suggest that African-American men may experience greater benefit from chemotherapy and hormone-targeting treatment than Caucasians with mCRPC.African-American patients are at a higher risk of developing ...
  • Wednesday, August 08, 2018 09:52 AM
    As the development of modalities for prostate cancer (PCa) imaging advances, the challenge of accurate registration between images and histopathologic ground truth becomes more pressing. Localization of PCa, rather than detection, requires a pixel-to-pixel validation of imaging based on histopathology after radical prostatectomy. Such a registration procedure is challenging for ultrasound modalities; not only the deformations of the prostate after resection have to be taken into account, but also the ...
  • Tuesday, July 31, 2018 09:12 AM
    Renal and Urology NewsStudy Supports Prostate Cancer Active Surveillance for Younger MenRenal and Urology NewsThus, a patient aged 50 years would be expected to have an average 13% to 17% lower risk of GS upgrading and 12% to 20% lower risk of biopsy progression compared with a patient aged 60 years, the authors reported online ahead of print in Urology.Practice in South Texas Offers Vertically Integrated Cancer CareOncLiveDCH Regional Medical ...
  • Tuesday, July 24, 2018 08:48 AM
    Can a new clinical state for prostate cancer help personalize treatment for the disease? - Health Imaging
    For patients with metastatic prostate cancer, understanding its genesis and evolution can mean all the difference for treatment. But, what if, as a recent Journal of Nuclear Medicine perspective[1] proposes, a new “clinical state” could improve understanding and treatment of the disease?Hossein Jadvar, MD, PhD, with the University of Southern California in Los Angeles examined what previous researchers termed the “oligometastatic” state. The term is used to describe a step ...
  • Tuesday, July 17, 2018 10:47 AM
    News ReleaseTuesday, July 17, 2018The largest coordinated research effort to study biological and non-biological factors associated with aggressive prostate cancer in African-American men has begun. The $26.5 million study is called RESPOND, or Research on Prostate Cancer in Men of African Ancestry: Defining the Roles of Genetics, Tumor Markers, and Social Stress. It will investigate environmental and genetic factors related to aggressiveness of prostate cancer in African-American men to better ...
  • Tuesday, July 10, 2018 08:13 AM
    Combination of blood test and imaging improves detection of prostate cancer - Medical Xpress
    New research from Karolinska Institutet shows that the blood test Stockholm3 together with magnetic resonance imaging and targeted prostate biopsies may lead to a significant decrease in the number of biopsy procedures and diagnoses of harmless disease. The study is published in European Urology. The study compares traditional detection of prostate cancer[1] with a novel practice using a blood test[2], the Stockholm3 test, in combination with magnetic resonance imaging[3] (MRI) ...
  • Friday, June 29, 2018 03:00 AM
    Drug May Help Keep Aggressive Prostate Cancer in Check
    By Dennis ThompsonHealthDay ReporterWEDNESDAY, June 27, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Men with localized high-risk prostate cancer[1] can slow its spread by using a cancer[2] drug that's already on the market, a new clinical trial shows.The targeted drug enzalutamide (Xtandi) reduced by 71 percent these men's risk of either dying from their prostate cancer[3] or having the cancer[4] spread to other organs, compared against a placebo. The drug also delayed their ...
  • Saturday, June 16, 2018 07:00 AM
    Why more men are delaying prostate cancer treatment
    When Ben Pfeiffer was diagnosed with prostate cancer in April, his urologist noted in the biopsy report that he was leaning toward recommending that Pfeiffer have his prostate surgically removed. But Pfeiffer, 58, a married construction supervisor from Las Vegas with two grown daughters, said his wife insisted that he get a second opinion. It’s a good thing she did. The doctors Pfeiffer subsequently visited at the University of California ...
  • Tuesday, June 05, 2018 06:05 PM
    (Reuters Health) - Prostate cancer patients who smoke are more likely to have tumors return, spread to other parts of the body, and become fatal than nonsmokers, a new study suggests.
  • Monday, June 04, 2018 09:01 AM
    New prostate cancer drug Keytruda showed promising results in the first major clinical trial to test immunotherapy in some men with advanced prostate cancer.       
  • Thursday, May 24, 2018 03:00 AM
    By Dennis ThompsonHealthDay ReporterTUESDAY, May 22, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- There's good news for Americans in the war against cancer[1].Cancer[2] deaths continue to decline nationwide, according to the Annual Report to the Nation on the Status of Cancer.But the report also points to one troubling trend -- prostate cancer[3] deaths are creeping up again after years of decline, suggesting that controversy over the best way to screen for the disease ...
  • Tuesday, May 15, 2018 03:00 AM
    By Alan MozesHealthDay ReporterFRIDAY, May 11, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- If you or your child is taking an antibiotic, new research suggests you might want to watch closely for signs that kidney stones[1] might be developing."We found that five classes of commonly prescribed antibiotics were associated with an increased risk of kidney stones," explained study author Dr. Gregory Tasian.That increased risk appeared to linger for three to five years, and ...
  • Tuesday, May 08, 2018 09:48 AM
    CHICAGO (AP) — Whether to get screened for prostate cancer is a question that men aged 55 to 69 should decide themselves in consultation with their doctors, according to finalized guidance issued Tuesday by an influential panel of health care experts.New evidence suggests that PSA blood tests can slightly reduce the chances of dying from the disease for some men, so those decisions may be a little easier. Though screening ...
  • Saturday, April 28, 2018 03:00 AM
    By Dennis ThompsonHealthDay ReporterTHURSDAY, April 26, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Many of the rescue workers who flooded the ruins of the World Trade Center after 9/11 now face their own private battles for survival, a pair of new studies shows.New York City Fire Department employees who worked at Ground Zero are expected to develop cancer[1] at a greater rate than their fellow New Yorkers over the next decade, the first ...
  • Tuesday, April 24, 2018 03:00 AM
    MONDAY, April 23, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- A cancer[1] scare could increase the chances that you'll be diligent about recommended screenings in the future, a new study finds.People who got a false-positive result on a breast or prostate cancer screening[2] test were more likely to adhere to screening guidelines for breast cancer[3] and colon cancer[4] going forward, researchers found.False-positive findings are initial results that suggest cancer[5] but eventually turn out ...
  • Monday, April 09, 2018 06:15 PM
    Half of the men took part in a 12-week exercise and nutrition program, while the other half received only basic education about their diagnosis and about exercise.
  • Friday, March 30, 2018 03:00 AM
    WEDNESDAY, March 28, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Here's one way to cut the cost of a $10,000-a-month prostate cancer[1] drug: Take it with food, some researchers suggest.Investigators said they found that taking Zytiga (abiraterone acetate) with a low-fat breakfast boosts its efficiency. That could make it more convenient and significantly cheaper, the new study suggested.Zytiga is the standard medicine for prostate cancer[2] that has spread and has progressed despite hormonal ...
  • Saturday, March 17, 2018 03:00 AM
    FRIDAY, March 16, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Thinking about a vasectomy[1]? Now -- as March Madness begins -- might be just the time for the procedure.The NCAA basketball tournament and other major "sporting events are a popular time for men to schedule a vasectomy because we advise them to take it easy for two to three days after the procedure," Dr. Jim Dupree, an assistant professor of urology at the ...
  • Tuesday, March 13, 2018 03:00 AM
    FRIDAY, March 9, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- From age 50 on, most people are advised to get a colonoscopy[1] every 10 years to screen for colon cancer[2]. But others may need to start screening earlier due to certain risk factors, an expert says.People most at risk for colon cancer are those with a first-degree relative (parent, sibling or child) who has had the disease.Someone with more than one family member ...
  • Wednesday, February 21, 2018 03:30 PM
    (Reuters Health) - Men with prostate cancer who get the gland removed may be just as likely to suffer after-effects like erectile dysfunction and urinary incontinence with robotic surgery as with other operations, a UK study suggests. Researchers examined data on men with localized prostate cancer who had an operation known as a radical prostatectomy. These included 1,310 men who had minimally invasive robot-assisted procedures, 427 who had other minimally ...
  • Friday, February 16, 2018 02:00 AM
    WEDNESDAY, Feb. 14, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Erleada (apalutamide) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat non-spreading prostate cancer[1] that continues to grow despite hormone therapy[2].Prostate cancer[3] is the second-most-common form of the disease among men in the United States, the National Cancer Institute says. More than 161,000 men were diagnosed in 2017, and nearly 27,000 men were projected to die of prostate cancer last ...
  • Wednesday, February 07, 2018 03:15 PM
    By Robert Preidt HealthDay Reporter WEDNESDAY, Feb. 7, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Worried that the drugs[1] you're taking to lower cholesterol[2] or blood pressure[3] might make you more apt to develop erectile dysfunction[4]? That's not likely, a new Canadian study suggests. The study involved about 2,000 men who were taking a cholesterol[5]-lowering statin[6] drug, a blood pressure-lowering medication, or both. The statin[7] the men took was Crestor[8] (rosuvastatin[9]), and the ...
  • Friday, January 19, 2018 02:00 AM
    By Maureen SalamonHealthDay ReporterWEDNESDAY, Jan. 17, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Men who are avid cyclists needn't worry that hours spent on the bike will translate into problems in the bedroom or bathroom, new research claims.Reportedly the largest study of its kind involving bikers, swimmers and runners, the findings buck prior reports that cycling[1] could harm sexual or urinary function due to prolonged pressure on the buttocks and the perineum (the ...
  • Wednesday, December 13, 2017 01:33 PM
    If you do a search for pregnancy or fertility supplements, you’ll come across a plethora of products that claim to boost your chances for pregnancy. For those having trouble conceiving, these options look like a heaven-sent answer: no invasive procedures, no prescription drugs or hormones, just naturally boosted fertility. Before buying out the company’s stock, though, take some time to research what you’re putting in your body. Fertility supplements may ...
  • Tuesday, December 05, 2017 02:00 AM
    FRIDAY, Dec. 1, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- A common condition in men -- enlarged veins in the scrotum -- may raise the risk for heart disease[1] and diabetes[2], a new study suggests.The problem is known medically as varicoceles. It affects about 15 percent of men and can cause pain[3] and infertility[4]. Stanford University School of Medicine researchers wanted to find out if varicoceles increases the risk for other health problems."Varicoceles ...
  • Thursday, November 23, 2017 02:00 AM
    By Steven ReinbergHealthDay ReporterWEDNESDAY, Nov. 22, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Men who have trouble conceiving may have the air they breathe to blame, a new study by Chinese researchers suggests.Microscopic particles in the air called particulate matter (PM2.5) may affect the quality of sperm, which in turn can make it difficult to fertilize a woman's egg, the researchers said.PM2.5 stands for particulate matter with a diameter 2.5 micrometers or less. ...
  • Thursday, November 02, 2017 10:05 AM
    You thought you were done having kids, so that vasectomy seemed like a great idea. But now, you’re having second thoughts. Is it too late to become a dad again? You probably think you’re out of luck, since vasectomies are considered a permanent form of birth control. But can you reverse a vasectomy? First, a vasectomy refresher: In the surgical procedure, your doctor will seal or cut the tubes—called the ...
  • Tuesday, October 24, 2017 12:54 PM
    (Reuters Health) - Roughly half of adult women may experience urinary incontinence, but few of them get diagnosed and treated despite a wide range of options to address the problem, doctors say. Women are particularly prone to stress urinary incontinence, when the pelvic floor muscles are too weak to support the bladder. As a result, urine leaks during coughing, sneezing or exercise. Childbirth is a common reason for weak pelvic ...
  • Monday, October 09, 2017 10:15 AM
    By Karen Pallarito HealthDay Reporter MONDAY, Oct. 9, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Drinking plenty of water[1] each day may have an unexpected benefit -- staving off urinary tract infections, a new study reports. Young women plagued by UTIs who drank an additional 6 cups of water[2] each day were nearly half -- 48 percent -- as likely as a control group to have another infection, the study showed. The water ...
  • Tuesday, September 05, 2017 02:30 PM
    One in seven men will be diagnosed with a disease that rarely presents with symptoms: prostate cancer. There are more than 160,000 new cases of prostate cancer expected in the U.S. this year, and men have an 11.6-percent chance of developing the disease over the course of their lifetime, according to the NCI’s Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) program[1]. This common cancer is treatable when caught early, with a nearly ...
  • Thursday, August 03, 2017 12:00 PM
    Most prostate cancer patients found to have lymph node (LN) metastases at the time of radical prostatectomy (RP) are initially managed with observation, researchers reported online ahead of print in the Journal of Urology.Using the National Cancer Data Base, Piotr Zareba, MD, MPH, and colleagues at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York identified 7791 men who had LN metastases at the time of RP. Of these, 63% were ...